Videos

A basic need

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What’s the most important basic need: food, shelter, good physical and mental health, clothing?

If you had to give up one, which would it be? Many would keep food, shelter and clothing, until they absolutely had to focus on the health part.

What if you didn’t have to choose?

At The PEACH Pit, we believe good mental health is as basic a need as food, that no one should have to choose between any of the basic needs.

That’s why we’re a nonprofit.

We use an equity plan, giving everyone the opportunity to have a stake in their care:

  1. How much is your monthly income?
  2. How much are your expenses?
  3. What’s left?
  4. Of the amount that’s left, how much can you afford to pay each week for services – without financial strain?

Where does the fee balance come from?

Donations, grants, gifts all help us provide affordable mental health care to our clients who may struggle with the choice.

Please consider donating to The PEACH Pit. Every penny donated helps provide a basic need: mental health care.

Donate today.

Calling all federal employees

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Check out The PEACH Pit’s video for the Combined Federal Campaign Virtual Charity Fair to kick off the 2018 campaign. Please share with current and retired federal workers, and ask them to consider donating to us using CFC #27220.

The PEACH Pit (CFC #27220) is one of more than 20,000 nonprofit organizations worldwide approved to participate this year. Enter our CFC number on the following link to get more information: https://cfcgiving.opm.gov/offerings. Once on that site, donors can simply add us to their donation list.

One hundred percent of donations (ALL OF IT) goes to direct client care.

Video: Got a few minutes? Learn about us

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The PEACH Pit and Spirit’s Quest partner to provide equine-assisted psychotherapy, learning sessions, camps and demonstrations in Middle Georgia.

Four women sitting at a table in front of a bookshelf
Paige Jobe of Spirit’s Quest, second from left, and Gwendolyn Coley of The PEACH Pit, in green, discuss equine-assisted psychotherapy with the Georgia Post Review team. Click image to play (28:22).

Honoring a board member

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Margaret McCormick sitting in chair, in turquoise skirt suit. She's pointing at the camera and has a smirk on her face. It's her birthday.
Friends and family honor Mrs. McCormick at a banquet in Atlanta.

Our eldest board member, the woman who ensured The PEACH Pit had a place to call home, turned 95 on Aug. 18.

As part of the birthday celebration, alumni of the Fort Valley State University Baptist Student Union Gospel Choir gave an impromptu musical tribute.

She was a longtime educator and principal, and headed the FVSU BSU for decades. She’s a world traveler and motivator. She’s a role model for hundreds of former students and anyone who’s fortunate enough to cross her path.

Most importantly for us, she’s a wonderful ambassador for The PEACH Pit, spreading our mission and vision far and wide, whether at the senior citizens center where she volunteers twice a week, at church or at any meeting she attends.

Please help us congratulate Margaret McCormick on turning 95.

MLK Volunteer Day video

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Not only did Andrea M. Gibson help bring seven teens from Macon to volunteer at The PEACH Pit on Jan. 14, but she also shot pictures and video. Pictured below are Katherine Hosmer, left, and Jessica Wornum. Check out her work and learn more about what we do.

katherine-and-jessica-brushing

The energy of youth

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The Martin Luther King holiday weekend is an opportunity for many to give back to their communities, and seven students from Macon were among those who gave back to The PEACH Pit on Jan. 14 for Volunteer Day.

In the first hour, the young ladies – no males were there – and four of us “slightly” older ladies had disassembled about 20 corral panels, and then relocated and reassembled them to double the size of the front pasture.

Shianne Gibson, Mya Foster, Jessica Wornum, Yalandria Derricho, Legacy Gibson, Tiahna Ball, Zykerria Hill. We had the energy of the young at heart: Elissa McCaskill, Katherine Hosmer, Andrea Gibson, Demetria Cannady, Garrett Carter, Garry Cannady, Sarah Meleco and Gwendolyn Coley.
Kneeling, from left: Zykerria Hill, Yalandria Derricho, Jessica Wornum, Tiahna Ball and Sarah Meleco. Standing, from left, Mya Foster, Shianne Gibson, Andrea Gibson, Legacy Gibson, Garry Cannady, Demetria Cannady, Garrett Carter, Gwendolyn Coley, Elissa McCaskill and Katherine Hosmer. 

The girls were the strategists; they figured out the best approach – actually multiple approaches – and we tackled the job. Some worked in pairs, some solo. Lots of chatting and critiquing and laughing.

Lots of hard work. Lots of smiles.

These young ladies were a late addition to our MLK Volunteer Day. Their “neighborhood mom,” Andrea M. Gibson, left a voicemail for me Thursday after learning about us on a site for the MLK Day of Service. When I called her back, she said she was bringing six girls. When she showed up, seven piled out of her SUV, and she said more girls had wanted to come.

Three other volunteers from Valdosta joined us in the second hour, just in time to round out the top pasture and assist with grooming and moving the horses. They heard about us on online social media group for Georgia clinicians and are interested in equine-assisted psychotherapy.

Good teamwork. Great determination.

Last year, we had airmen from Robins Air Force Base. The coordinator, Jennifer Storms, had received one of our fliers and thought volunteering at our nonprofit would be adventurous. They got the job done … efficiently. They cleaned up debris, pounded stakes, brushed horses, whacked weeds.

Good strategists. Not as much chatting.

The PEACH Pit’s team this year consisted of one person: a disabled Army Veteran. Lots of adrenaline. Lots of determination. Lots of pain. And Ranger candy (800 milligrams of ibuprofen).

This is what the pasture looked like before the volunteers came out.
This is what the pasture looked like before the volunteers came out. The video is what it looked like afterward.

One thing the two volunteer groups had in common was energy. Young people. Fit people. Energy.

Oh, to have the energy of youth.

Wait, for the MLK Volunteer Day this year and last year, we did have the energy of youth: Shianne Gibson, Mya Foster, Jessica Wornum, Yalandria Derricho, Legacy Gibson, Tiahna Ball, Zykerria Hill. We had the energy of the young at heart: Elissa McCaskill, Katherine Hosmer, Andrea Gibson, Demetria Cannady, Garrett Carter, Garry Cannady, Sarah Meleco and Gwendolyn Coley.

Together, we accomplished much. We accomplish much at each volunteer day, and we generally have one a quarter. Each volunteer day means we don’t have to pay for those services. Not having to pay for those services means we can minimize the fees clients pay for our services. Not paying for those services means your donations allow us to focus our energy on helping our clients.

If you’re interested in participating in one of our volunteer days, visit our events page (www.thepeachpitgeorgia.org/events). We always feed our volunteers, and we generally have some giveaways and a demonstration of our therapy model.

If you’re interested in donating to The PEACH Pit, you can do so at https://thepeachpitgeorgia.org/matching-funds/. The donate button is on the right side of the page. To double your donation, scroll through the list to see if your employer is there. If so, ask your employer to match your donation.

The day has been long, exhilarating and exhausting. The girls who volunteered likely still are chatting, critiquing and laughing. The rest of us are likely pooped and in need of rest.

Oh, to have the energy of youth. Again. Next volunteer day.

Horses help people fight addiction

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People in addiction recovery can find comfort and communication in the company of horses at facilities across the world, such as The PEACH Pit, that practice equine-assisted therapy.

In this video, clients are at a rural facility in Kinderhook, N.Y. called Stable Solutions.

Equine-assisted therapy helps patients open up, thanks to the animals’ sensitivity to body language, says co-founder Keri NearyWood, a social worker and equine specialist.

WRGB-TV (Albany, N.Y.) (2/15)

Video of man touching horse's neck