D-Day

Impact of D-Day

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Soldiers leaving a boat and in the water of Omaha Beach, Normandy, during World War II.
Assault landing, one of the first waves at Omaha Beach, Normandy. The Coast Guard caption identifies the unit as Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Photo courtesy of Center of Military History.

D-Day affected the world on a large scale. It affected individuals on a personal scale.

As we celebrate the 75th anniversary of D-Day, the largest amphibious attack in history, we honor the thousands of Allied servicemembers who lost their lives in France in an effort to save the world from tyranny.

D-Day, so called because it was Day 1 of the invasion, was a brutal and important day toward Allied victory in World War II.

It also had a lasting effect in a different way.

A 90-year-old French woman who lives feet from a Normandy beach, for example, reported she hasn’t stepped foot on the beach since she was a teenager, when she saw bodies of Allied servicemembers strewn along the sand.

Untreated trauma can haunt for a lifetime. It’s never too late to get help.

We can help.