COVID-19

Saving the world with masks

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The PEACH Pit recently partnered with Sew Blessed Alterations to provide face masks for employees at the Fort Valley Post Office.

A seamstress with a cause

Kandace Marie Hodge, owner of Sew Blessed Alterations who works at The PEACH PIT, came up with the idea. She provided the fabric and other supplies, and The PEACH Pit provided volunteer labor, better known as grandchildren. The work was done at Smiley’s Flea Market in Macon, where Kandace Marie’s shop is housed. The flea market was closed, which allowed the team to maintain a safe distance from others.

The work entitled ironing interfacing onto fabric, cutting and pinning patterns, cutting fabric, stitching masks, ironing mask seams and inserting elastic.

So far, the postal workers have received 30 of the 52 masks needed to protect them. The remainder were awaiting delivery.

Navigating COVID-19 together

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Horsepower and Heroes logo of horse and U.S. flagUnderstandably, the novel coronavirus pandemic has many people concerned. As we all navigate the impact of COVID-19, we’ve made some decisions about events at The PEACH Pit to keep our visitors, therapists and clients safe.

We’re postponing the Horsepower and Heroes Retreat, scheduled for May 1-3; we’ll post here when we set the new dates for the retreat.

We’re also suspending group volunteer activities. We will continue to accept individual volunteers, and we’ll continue to see clients since the majority of our sessions are outdoors in open-air settings that maintain a safe distance from others. 

Meanwhile, here are a few tips to help you protect yourself physically and emotionally:

  • Limit your intake of media. Repeated exposure to the same stressful event can exacerbate your stress response. It’s good to stay in the know, but consider limiting your ingestion of news media, especially if you are starting to feel overwhelmed.
  • Take care of your body. Drink lots of water, eat healthy and continue with your normal exercise routine.
  • Make time to relax. With the news of any large scale adverse event, there is an inherent sense of urgency. We can get wrapped up the energy of outside actors (newscasters, politicians, fundraisers, etc.). Constant vigilance is not good for your body. To counteract it, use your relaxation coping skills like breathing, journaling or listening to music.
  • Talk about it. Connect with others about how you’re feeling and what concerns you have. Connect with them about other things, too. There’s no reason to stop living your life.
  • Take appropriate precautions to keep yourself healthy. Follow the CDC guidelines for prevention: Wash your hands regularly, avoid touching your face and avoid contact with people known to be sick. 

If you find that you are having a difficult time coping or that you are feeling overwhelmed, please reach out. Our counseling sessions can help, and you’ll be able to maintain a safe social distance, as well.